direct observation

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Lean – What Is the ROI?

By | January 3rd, 2016|Categories: Blog, Lean Learning, Lean Progress Newsletter|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Lean – What Is the ROI? “What is the return on investment for lean?” This question is asked frequently in our Lean Experience and Leading Lean sessions.  It’s a fair question. This week I had a chance to see a great example of the ROI of lean. A little background - the company I visited this [...]

Some ideas on IDEAS

By | July 18th, 2013|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

A common lament that I hear from most companies, incluing my old company, is the difficulty they have getting employees to frequently contribute quality ideas (suggestions) to improve the performance of the organization, and even their own work.  The good old “suggestion box” has been around for decades with varying degrees of success but mostly ineffective.  [...]

Video: Walk-out Wednesdays at Network Rail

By | January 2nd, 2013|Categories: Videos|Tags: , , , , , , |

In our first video with a client, Andy Carlino discusses with Phil Verster of Network Rail the practice of Walk-out Wednesdays. This routine gets people to the "gemba", or real place where the real work is done, to practice fundamentals such as direct observation and waste elimination. [viddler id=d69fd878 h=370 w=437]

If You Want to Learn More About Lean–Quit Reading Books About Lean

By | May 7th, 2012|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

On the surface this really sounds like a dumb thing to say particularly coming from someone who has co-authored a relatively successful lean book.  It is also counterintuitive.   Shouldn’t you always read books specifically about the subject you are trying to master?  What I recently discovered is that I’m learning more about lean by reading seemingly unrelated books.    […]

Creativity–An Intended Consequence

By | April 9th, 2012|Categories: Blog|Tags: , , , , , |

I couldn’t possibly count the number of times I heard that “I work in an environment that requires creativity and lean doesn’t apply to my work”.  Over and over again I have offered how important lean principles are to creating an environment for creativity.  I am convinced more than ever that this is true but I have recently become convinced that lean principles also create a “mindset” for creativity.  This most recent revelation, or possibly validation, occurred while reading two very different publications.  The first is “IMAGINE-How Creativity Works” by Jonah Lehrer.  The second is an article in New Scientist, “Zap your brain into the zone: Fast track to pure focus” by Sally Adee.  […]